Tehran terrorists had fought for IS in Raqqa and Mosul

"Death to America", "Death to the Saud" ruling family, and "We are not afraid", shouted the crowd gathered behind a lorry bearing the coffins of 15 of the 17 people killed in Wednesday's attacks.

Attackers raided Iran's parliament and opened fire at the Mausoleum of Ayatollah Khomeini a few kilometers south of the capital on Wednesday morning, in near simultaneous assaults that killed up to seven people, media reported.

Iran's foreign minister on Thursday rejected Donald Trump's condolences for deadly attacks in Tehran, calling the United States president's words repugnant.

That was condemned by Zarif, who tweeted: "Repugnant WH (White House) statement... as Iranians counter terror backed by USA clients".

He added that the "Iranian people reject such US claims of friendship".

The assault was the first claimed by the Islamic State group in Iran, and was the worst terror strike to hit the nation in years.

The attacks have been claimed by Islamic State but Iranian hardliners believe that Saudi Arabia was behind the attacks, Omid Nouripour, the foreign affairs spokesman for the German Green Party, told German broadcaster RBB.

Fifty-two others were injured in the attacks, according to the Interior Ministry.

This week's attacks at Parliament and the mausoleum of the Islamic Republic's founder Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini have exposed shortcomings within the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which was supposed to be protecting these potent symbols of Iran's revolution.

It suggested there were only five attackers rather than the six originally reported.

The comments sparked anger from Iranians on social media, who recalled the vigils in Tehran that followed the September 11 attacks.

The ministry said that the gunmen had a record in "terrorism" with links to the Sunni extremist groups, who had then joined the ISIS group and fought alongside the ISIS militants in Mosul and Raqqa.

He said anti-Iranian remarks by Saudi Arabia's foreign minister and US President Donald Trump are a "matter of disgrace" for them.

The Saudi prince, Mohammed bin Salman, who is also the defense minister, accused Iran in May of seeking to occupy the Islamic holy sites in Saudi Arabia.

During a speech that was planned before the attack on June 7, Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei addressed the attacks and linked them to Iran's support for the governments of Iraq and Syria in their fights against IS.

It added that the terrorists were detained in the Iranian province of Kermanshah, Kordestan, West Azarbaijan and Tehran. Sunni Saudi Arabia denied any involvement in the attacks.

  • Joey Payne