Kavanaugh hearing for Supreme Court seat to be held in September

Chuck Grassley, the Republican chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said the committee will launch up to four days of review on Tuesday, beginning with opening remarks from senators. "He's a mainstream judge".

Carrie Severino, chief counsel and policy director for the Judicial Crisis Network, expects the process to move steadily forward, despite Democrat demands for more time to evaluate Kavanaugh's record.

"At this current pace, we have plenty of time to review the rest of emails and other records that we will receive from President Bush and the National Archives", he said.

"Judge Kavanaugh looks forward to addressing the Judiciary Committee in public hearings for the American people to view", Shah said.

In 2016, Senate Republicans refused to hold confirmation hearings for President Barack Obama's nominee to the Supreme Court, Merrick Garland, believing that the Supreme Court vacancy occurred too close to the election.

August 10: Senator Grassley announces that Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings will be held September 4-6, 2018.

So far, the committee has made public Kavanaugh's 17,000-page questionnaire and his more than 300 court cases as an appellate judge.

"We're moving right along", McConnell said during a radio interview in Kentucky ahead of the announcement. Kavanaugh - who previously said that a sitting President should be above the law, should not be subject criminal indictment, no matter what evidence is uncovered, and can ignore the laws they think are unconstitutional - would likely have the swing vote on this decision.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.), the Judiciary Committee's top Democrat, raised concerns about a "lack of transparency" in releasing Kavanaugh's papers in a new letter to Grassley on Friday.

August 2: Former President George W. Bush revealed he is working with William A. Burck - a right-wing political operative who served as a deputy to Kavanaugh in 2005 and is now the attorney representing Steve Bannon, Reince Priebus, and Donald McGahn in the Russian Federation probe - to vet which documents from Kavanaugh's record are released to the Senate Judiciary Committee. Senate Democrats have railed against the process of releasing Kavanaugh's documents, arguing that they should be privy to documents from Kavanaugh's tenure as staff secretary in the Bush Administration.

August 8: Sen. Blumenthal and Senate Judiciary Committee Democrats file a Freedom of Information Act request seeking release all of Kavanaugh's White House documents.

[I] t appears that senators belonging to the majority party are using outside channels to secure preferential access to records and to determine which documents will be released, and therefore have undue influence over both the Senate's and the public's perceptions of the nominee. His confirmation will require a simple majority in the 100-seat Senate, where Republicans hold a 51-49 edge over Democrats and independents. "Republican efforts to make this the least transparent, most secretive Supreme Court nomination in history continue".

  • Joey Payne