U.K. Labour leader agrees no deal Brexit would be 'catastrophic'

Rejecting her proposed package, she said it "would be a catastrophic and unforgivable breach of trust in our democracy". The pair surged during London trading hours after Conservative rebel Dominic Grieve urged UK PM Theresa May to delay Brexit if her deal is rejected, and while Downing Street later stated that there won't be an extension of Art. 50, the currency held on to gains.

In a significant shift of tone apparently created to win over hardline Brexiteers who have set their faces against Mrs May's deal, Mr Hunt warned that defeat next week would not necessarily provide MPs with the opportunity to choose their preferred version of Brexit.

"I think that is something that we would regret for many, many generations".

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling insisted the Government has put forward a "sensible compromise deal" before denying troops were being sought to help with no-deal Brexit traffic plans.

TNE columnist and Labour peer Andrew Adonis said: "When Chris Grayling can organise a lorry jam and a railway timetable, we'll take his advice on fixing a political system which he did more than nearly anyone to break".

Asked about reports of a plot to take control of parliamentary business away from the Government, Barclay said: "What recent events have shown, with events over the last week with what happened on the legal advice where the Government was forced to act in a way it didn't want to, is the uncertainty in terms of what will happen in the House has increased".

The country's 29 March deadline for exiting the European Union is now regarded by Brussels as highly unlikely to be met given the domestic opposition facing the prime minister and it is expecting a request from London to extend article 50 in the coming weeks. "We have seen from this week that parliament has the ability to assert itself and to shape outcomes".

The deal has come under fire from across the political spectrum, with opponents of the European Union seeking a cleaner break and pro-European lawmakers pressing for a second vote on membership of the bloc.

Theresa May faces huge opposition to her Brexit bill, from both sides of the House of Commons.

Although the British Prime Minister had postponed the vote which had originally been set for December in order to get enough lawmakers from her own party or others to back the deal she has made with Brussels, she is still reportedly expected to lose the vote.

But she said: "I intend to work with colleagues to make sure we avoid it".

But he said he does not have the military "actively involved" in no-deal planning beyond the secondment of a "small number" of staff from the Ministry of Defence.

Pressed for a third time by interviewer Justin Webb on whether she would quit if Mrs May went for the no-deal option, Ms Rudd cut him short by saying: "Thank you very much, Justin".

  • Joey Payne